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Current RFPs

Click above to download a monthly grant opportunities calendar, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS

Click above to download a monthly grant opportunities calendar with opportunities that center on student success, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar with opportunities that reflect widescale efforts to broaden participation and engage students and researchers from underrepresented groups, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar for early career researchers, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS

The Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative, or NIH HEAL Initiative, is a trans-NIH research effort focused on improving prevention and treatment for opioid misuse and addiction and enhancing pain management.  The NIH HEAL Initiative is organized into six research focus areas. Within those focus areas, 12 NIH Institutes and Centers are leading 25 research programs to find scientific solutions to the opioid crisis.  Click on the link above for details about the six research areas.

Applications are due by April 12, 2021.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) is soliciting investigator-initiated research that will support the identification of effective strategies for state, community, or systems-level implementation to prevent fatal and nonfatal overdoses involving illicit stimulants (e.g., methamphetamine and cocaine) as well as polysubstance use and overdose involving illicit stimulants. This Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) is intended to support research on one of the following two Objectives:  1: Conduct a process and outcome evaluation of new or adapted strategies, programs, or policies that can be implemented at the state, community, or systems-level to prevent illicit stimulant use or fatal and nonfatal overdose involving illicit stimulants, or polysubstance use or overdose involving illicit stimulants, OR 2: Assess risk and protective factors for illicit stimulant use, use disorder, and overdose that can contribute to the development or adaptation of intervention strategies.

LOIs due April 28, 2021; applications due by May 28, 2021.

The Transformative Research to Address Health Disparities and Advance Health Equity at Minority Serving Institutions initiative is soliciting applications to support collaborative investigative teams or individual scientists who propose unusually innovative research projects, which, if successful, would have a major impact in developing, implementing, or disseminating innovative and effective interventions to prevent, reduce, or eliminate health disparities and advance health equity. No preliminary data are required. Projects must clearly demonstrate, based on the strength of the logic, a compelling potential to produce a major impact in addressing health disparities and advancing health equity.

LOIs due April 28, 2021; applications due by May 28, 2021.

The Transformative Research to Address Health Disparities and Advance Health Equity initiative is soliciting applications to support collaborative investigative teams or individual scientists who propose unusually innovative research projects, which, if successful, would have a major impact in developing, implementing, or disseminating innovative and effective interventions to prevent, reduce, or eliminate health disparities and advance health equity. No preliminary data are required. Projects must clearly demonstrate, based on the strength of the logic, a compelling potential to produce a major impact in addressing health disparities and inequities.

Applications are due by April 29, 2021.

RSF and the William T. Grant Foundation seek research projects that aim to deepen our understanding of educational opportunity and success in the United States by analyzing data on academic achievement from the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) constructed by Sean Reardon and colleagues at The Educational Opportunity Project (EOP) at Stanford University.

Applications are due by May 1, 2021.

$5,000 to support an early career psychologists or graduate student for research or projects in the area of ethics and risk management.

Applications are due by May 1, 2021.

Applications are due by May 3, 2021.

The mission of the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) is to improve the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) by funding innovative research of the highest quality and relevance. Grants awarded through this RFA are intended to produce foundational knowledge about the neurobehavioral differences associated with ASD, which will directly inform the development or refinement of tools needed for translational efforts, such as biomarkers and outcome measures. Special emphasis is placed on objective, quantitative measures that may be used in conjunction with standardized clinical measures and genomic information to better triangulate phenotypic and neurobiological variability within and across individuals with ASD.  The maximum budget is $750,000 or less, inclusive of 20 percent indirect costs, over a period of up to three years.

Applications are due by May 4, 2021.

RSF recently approved nineteen Presidential Authority grants and one supplemental grant in the foundation’s programs on Future of WorkRace, Ethnicity, and Immigration; and Social, Political, and Economic Inequality. Additional grants were made in its special initiatives on Decision Making and Human Behavior in Context and Immigration and Immigrant Integration.

Letters of Inquiry due May 5, 2021. 

Applications are due by May 6, 2021.

The Conference Grant Program provides support to scholars to organize small research conferences, focused symposia, or other forms of convenings around important issues in education research. This program is intended to bring together researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and other important collaborators whose expertise, substantive knowledge and practice, theoretical insight, or methodological expertise can be engaged in ways that help to build upon and advance education research. We encourage applicants to think creatively about how convenings can expand the substantive work and impact of educational research on advancing racial equity. This grant program supports proposals with budgets of $50,000 or less.

Applications are due by May 7, 2021.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is working to improve the environment and public health conditions of low-income communities and communities of color through the advancement of racial equity and environmental justice. This announcement places emphasis on projects focusing on COVID-19 impacts, as well as climate and disaster resiliency. Additionally, EPA is emphasizing projects addressing diesel pollution in underserved communities living near ports and railyards as part of EPA’s Ports Initiative.

Applications are due by May 7, 2021.

The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) seeks innovative applications for the establishment, improvement, or expansion of world language programs targeting elementary and secondary students in order to enable successful students, as they advance from elementary school through secondary school, to achieve advanced level of proficiency in those languages. In addition, any Local Education Agency (LEA) awarded a grant under this program must use the funds to support programs that show promise of being continued beyond the grant period and demonstrate approaches that could be disseminated to and duplicated in other LEAs. Awarded projects may also include a professional development component. DoDEA intends to award multiple grants, subject to the availability of funds. Each individual grant award will be a minimum of $500,000.00 and may be up to a maximum of $3,000,000, for a period of up to five (5) years.

Applications due by May 10, 2021.

Intertwined networks connect living things in profoundly complex and oftentimes unexpected ways. From individual cells and organisms to entire ecosystems and industries, the emergence of such networks is the focus of a new solicitation calling for research proposals from a broad range of scientific disciplines, including the social, behavioral and economic sciences. The solicitation seeks proposals that embody crosscutting, convergent research addressing significant scientific questions by integrating perspectives and approaches from multiple disciplines.

Applications due by May 10, 2021.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) is soliciting investigator-initiated research proposals to rigorously evaluate approaches (programs, policies, or practices) for their impact on primary prevention of child sexual abuse (CSA) perpetrated by youth or adults. Research funded under this announcement will strengthen the evidence base for primary prevention of youth- or adult-perpetrated CSA. Applicants must propose rigorous evaluation designs, which for the purposes of this funding opportunity can include those that utilize experimental designs (i.e., randomized controlled trials) or quasi-experimental designs (e.g., comparative interrupted time series design, difference-in- differences, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, regression point displacement, stepped wedge, propensity-score matching, comparison groups).

LOIs due by May 31, 2021.

The Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood is an incubator of promising research and development projects that appear likely to improve the welfare of young children, from infancy through 7 years, in the United States. Welfare is broadly defined to include physical and mental health, safety, nutrition, education, play, familial support, acculturation, societal integration and childcare.

Applications due by June 9, 2021.

Achieving racial equity and health equity in American communities requires effective solutions to the “wrong-pocket problem”: we invest in systems that are designed to improve social and economic conditions—such as housing, transportation, education, income, and employment assistance; child and family supports; and legal and criminal justice services—but the financial benefits of these often flow elsewhere, in reduced costs for medical care from diseases and injuries prevented. This creates imbalances in power, information, and financial resources that exist across medical, social, and public health systems—a fundamental problem that confronts many attempts at meaningful cross-sector collaboration. Such solutions must allow collaborating organizations to equitably share in the costs and the benefits of multisector collaborative initiatives, and to share in the power and influence that govern these initiatives. This call for proposals (CFP) will provide funding for new research to rigorously test and evaluate innovative solutions to the wrong-pocket problem that persists across health and social service systems.

Applications due by June 24, 2021.

The Visiting Scholars Program provides a unique opportunity for select scholars in the social, economic, political and behavioral sciences to pursue their research and writing while in residence at the foundation in New York City. The fellowship period is September 1st through June 30th.

Applications due by July 7, 2021.

The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.  Applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take measured risks in their work, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as a supportive academic community.

Awards are based on applicants’ potential to become influential researchers, as well as their plans to expand their expertise in new and significant ways. The application should make a cohesive argument for how the applicant will expand his or her expertise. The research plan should evolve in conjunction with the development of new expertise, and the mentoring plan should describe how the proposed mentors will support applicants in acquiring that expertise. Proposed research plans must address questions that are relevant to policy and practice in the Foundation’s focus areas.

Applications due August 10, 2021.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) is designed to foster highly innovative or conceptually creative research related to the etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, or treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs). It supports high-risk and potentially high-impact research that is underrepresented or not included in NIDA’s current portfolio that has the potential to transform SUD research. The proposed research should: 1. develop, and/or adapt, revolutionary techniques or methods for addiction research or that show promising future applicability to SUD research; and /or 2. test an innovative and significant hypothesis for which there are scant precedent or preliminary data and which, if confirmed, would transform current thinking.

LOIs due July 20, 2021; applications due by August 24, 2021.

This initiative will support observational or intervention research to understand and address the impact of structural racism and discrimination (SRD) on minority health and health disparities.

Applications due by August 30, 2021.

CAORC is currently accepting applications for faculty development seminars to India, Mexico, and Senegal for community college and minority-serving institution faculty and administrators.  The seminars, which will take place in 2022, are fully-funded and allow participants to gain the first-hand experience to develop international courses, curriculum, and teaching materials.

Applications due by September 1, 2021.

HEI has established the Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award to provide funding for outstanding investigators who are beginning independent research. By providing financial support for investigators at this early point in their careers, HEI hopes to encourage highly qualified individuals to undertake research on the health effects of air pollution. The candidates may have training and experience in any of the many branches of science relevant to air pollution.  Each award will be a maximum of $500,000 for three years1 in total costs to support a research project. The funds can be used to provide salary support for the investigator and supporting junior personnel as well as
operating costs, including supplies and equipment. It is expected that the investigator will devote at least 25% of his or her time on the proposed research. HEI expects to provide one or two awards from this RFA and make
additional awards each year.

Applications are due by October 7, 2021.

The EHR Core Research program (ECR) invites proposals for fundamental research (basic research or use-inspired basic research) that advances knowledge in one or more of the three Research Tracks: Research on STEM Learning and Learning Environments, Research on Broadening Participation in STEM fields, and Research on STEM Workforce Development.

LOIs due by October 15, 2021; applications due by November 15, 2021.

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications for Comprehensive Alcohol Research Centers using the P60 mechanism which requires a dissemination core to initiate and expand community education related to the activities of the center. The overall purpose of the NIAAA Alcohol Research Center program is to provide leadership in conducting and fostering interdisciplinary, collaborative research on a wide variety of topics relevant to the Institute’s mission. These topics include, but are not limited to: the nature, etiology, genetics, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of alcohol use disorder, alcohol-related end organ diseases and their biomedical, psychosocial, and economic consequences across the lifespan and racial/ethnic groups and other health disparity populations. Centers also are regional or national resources that contribute to the development of new research methods, technologies and approaches that sustain innovative goal-directed research.


 

For Assistance with Proposals and Awards

Social science PIs obtain pre-award and post-grant management assistance from MIPAR, a grants administration unit housed within the Center for Social Science Scholarship. Learn how to get started with MIPAR here.

To set up an appointment, email mipar_info@umbc.edu.

Go here to view CAHSS deadlines for proposal routing and submissions.

Arts and humanities faculty, please contact Rachel Brubaker in the Dresher Center for the Humanities for funding opportunities and assistance.

For faculty interested in submitting proposals to corporations or foundations, please consult Bruce Lyons in UMBC’s Office of Institutional Advancement.