Current RFPs

Subscribe to CS3’s External Funding Calendar to follow proposal and application due dates.  Browse the calendar or the chronological drop down list below, and scroll to the bottom of this page for more funding resources!

External Funding Calendar

Annual RFPs

Partnerships for Innovation (NSF)

Proposals are due in May, September, and January annually.

This program has the goal of: (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators.

Research Infrastructure in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (NSF)

Proposals are accepted at any time.

This program supports projects that create computational tools and data to facilitate basic research in the social and behavioral sciences that can lead to improved health, prosperity and security. Projects should be aimed at creating computational tools and data to enable research by social scientists. Examples include, but are not limited to, data collection or assembly efforts that result in new resources for a community of researchers or software platforms that facilitate data collection efforts by others.

Research Coordination Networks (NSF)

Proposals are accepted at any time.

The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic, and international boundaries. The RCN program provides opportunities to foster new collaborations, including international partnerships where appropriate, and address interdisciplinary topics. Innovative ideas for implementing novel networking strategies, collaborative technologies, training, broadening participation, and development of community standards for data and meta- data are especially encouraged. RCN awards are not meant to support existing networks; nor are they meant to support the activities of established collaborations.

Advancing Informal STEM Learning (NSF)

Proposals are due in January annually.

This program is committed to funding research and practice, with continued focus on investigating a range of informal STEM learning experiences and environments that make lifelong learning a reality. The current solicitation encourages proposals from institutions and organizations that serve public audiences, and specifically focus on public engagement with and understanding of STEM, including community STEM; public participation in scientific research; science communication; intergenerational STEM engagement; and STEM media.

Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources (NSF)

Proposals are due annually in January and July.

This is a core NSF STEM education program that seeks to promote novel, creative, and transformative approaches to generating and using new knowledge about STEM teaching and learning to improve STEM education for undergraduate students. The program is open to application from all institutions of higher education and associated organizations. NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate public.

Social Psychology (NSF)

Proposals are due annually in January 15th  and July 15th.

This program supports research to advance basic knowledge in social psychology. Proposed research should carry strong potential for creating transformative advances in the basic understanding of human social behavior. Among the many research topics supported are social cognition, attitudes, social and cultural influence, stereotypes, motivation, decision making, group dynamics, aggression, close relationships, social and affective neuroscience, social psychophysiology, emotions, prosocial behavior, health-related behavior, and personality and individual differences.

Science and Technology Studies (NSF)

Proposals are due in early February and early August annually.

Science and Technology Studies is an interdisciplinary field that investigates the conceptual foundations, historical developments and social contexts of STEM, including medical science. The STS program supports proposals across a broad spectrum of research that uses historical, philosophical and social scientific methods to investigate STEM theory and practice. STS research may be empirical or conceptual; specifically, it may focus on the intellectual, material or social facets of STEM including interdisciplinary studies of ethics, equity, governance and policy issues.

Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (NSF)

Proposals are due by mid-November annually.

The multi-agency Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program supports research on the ecological, evolutionary, organismal, and social drivers that influence the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The central theme of submitted projects must be the quantitative, mathematical, or computational understanding of pathogen transmission dynamics. The intent is discovery of principles of infectious disease (re)emergence and transmission and testing mathematical or computational models that elucidate infectious disease systems. Projects should be broad, interdisciplinary efforts that go beyond the scope of typical studies.

Workplace Equity for Persons with Disabilities in STEM and STEM Education (NSF)

Proposals are due in September annually.

This program supports fundamental, applied, and translational research that advances knowledge and practice about diverse, equitable, inclusive, and accessible STEM and STEM education workplaces and postsecondary training environments for persons with disabilities. Supported topics include studying barriers and solutions to diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility in STEM; applying intersectional social identity perspectives to investigate characteristics and conditions of STEM and STEM education workplaces and training environments; etc.

Evidence for Action: Innovative Research to Advance Racial Equity

Open application

Evidence for Action (E4A), a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, funds research that expands the evidence needed to build a Culture of Health, with an explicit emphasis on advancing racial equity. We recognize that achieving racial equity is not possible without a focus on the foundational and structural drivers of health, often referred to as the social determinants of health (e.g., housing, education, built environment, economic opportunity, law enforcement, and others). Therefore, we partner with researchers, practitioners, community leaders, advocates, and policymakers to develop evidence about what works to dismantle or remedy unjust systems and practices and produce more equitable outcomes for people and communities of color.

NIH Helping to End Addiction Longterm (HEAL) Initiative

The Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative, or NIH HEAL Initiative, is a trans-NIH research effort focused on improving prevention and treatment for opioid misuse and addiction and enhancing pain management.  The NIH HEAL Initiative is organized into six research focus areas. Within those focus areas, 12 NIH Institutes and Centers are leading 25 research programs to find scientific solutions to the opioid crisis.  Click on the link above for details about the six research areas.

Wrenner-Gren Foundation – Anthropology Post-PhD Research Grant

Application Deadlines are May 1st and November 1st.

This grant program funds individual research projects undertaken by doctorates in anthropology or a closely related field. Our goal is to support vibrant and significant work that furthers our understanding of what it means to be human. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, topic, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that integrate two or more subfields and pioneer new approaches and ideas.

Wenner-Gren Foundation – Anthropology Conference and Workshop Grant

Application deadlines are June 1st and December 1st.  

This grant program supports meetings and events that promote the development of inclusive communities of anthropologists and advance significant and innovative research. Conferences that we support are public events directed at large audiences of anthropologists. We prioritize scholarly gatherings that bring together members of large, international anthropological organizations. Workshops that we support are closed meetings focused on pressing topics in anthropology. Small groups of scholars gather for several days to work intensively on particular themes. Our aim is to help organizers make these conferences and workshops more inclusive and accessible by covering costs for scholars who might not otherwise be able to attend.

Time-Sensitive Research Opportunities in Environmental Health Sciences (R21) (NIH)

Letters of Intent are due 30 days before standard NIH dates, through December 2025.

This program is intended to support novel environmental health research in which an unpredictable event or policy change provides a limited window of opportunity to collect human biological samples or environmental exposure data. The primary motivation of the FOA is to understand the consequences of natural and human-made disasters, emerging environmental public health threats, and policy changes in the U.S. and abroad.

Accelerating the Pace of Drug Abuse Research Using Existing Data (R21) (NIH)

Letters of Intent are are due 30 days before standard NIH dates, through November 2024.

This program aims to invite applications proposing innovative analysis of existing social science, behavioral, administrative, and neuroimaging data to study the etiology and epidemiology of substance using behaviors (defined as alcohol, tobacco, prescription, and other substances) and related disorders, prevention of substance use and HIV, and health service utilization.


April 2024 Deadlines

Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad Fellowship Program (ED)

Proposals are due by April 23, 2024.

This program provides grants to colleges and universities to fund fellowships for faculty members seeking to improve their area studies and foreign language skills by conducting research abroad. The program is generally designed to contribute to the development and improvement of the study of modern foreign languages and area studies in the United States.

 

Applications are due by April 24, 2024.

Grants of up to $22,000 will be awarded to early-career psychologists conducting research in early intervention and treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children.  Applicants must be early-career psychologists with a degree from an accredited university and no more than 10 years postdoctoral.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund: Climate Change and Human Health Seed Grants

Proposals are due by April 25, 2024.

The fund invites applications for its Climate Change and Human Health Seed Grants program, which aims to stimulate the growth of new connections between thinkers working in largely disconnected fields who could together redirect the course of climate change’s impact on human health. Small, early-stage grants of between $2,500 and $50,000 will be awarded through the program.

2024 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

Application deadline is April 30, 2024.

The Center for Retirement Research sponsors the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement or disability research and policy.  The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities for junior or non-tenured scholars (within seven years of receiving their Ph.D.) from all academic disciplines to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement or disability issues.  Individuals from historically underserved or underrepresented communities are encouraged to apply.

Applicants must demonstrate that their proposal focuses on at least one of SSA’s research focal areas:

  • Disparities by race, ethnicity, and sex;
  • Addressing barriers to disability program and SSI program participation;
  • Economic security of program applicants and beneficiaries;
  • Understanding service needs;
  • Understanding communication needs; and
  • Addressing employment barriers for people with disabilities.

2024 Dissertation Fellowship Program

Application deadline is April 30, 2024.

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College sponsors the annual Dissertation Fellowship Program in the field of retirement or disability research.  The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration and provides funding opportunities for doctoral candidates to pursue cutting-edge research on retirement or disability issues.  Individuals from historically underserved or underrepresented communities are encouraged to apply.

Applicants must demonstrate that their proposal focuses on at least one of SSA’s research focal areas:

  • Disparities by race, ethnicity, and sex;
  • Addressing barriers to disability program and SSI program participation;
  • Economic security of program applicants and beneficiaries;
  • Understanding service needs;
  • Understanding communication needs; and
  • Addressing employment barriers for people with disabilities.

May 2024 Deadlines

Civic Innovation Challenge (CIVIC) Program(NSF)

Applications are due by May 1, 2024.

NSF seeks proposals for projects that address community-challenges identified via tight collaboration between civic and academic partners, with the goal of achieving concrete impacts in the communities. This round of CIVIC is centered around two tracks:

Track A: Climate and Environmental Instability – Building Resilient Communities through Co-Design, Adaption, and Mitigation

Track B: Bridging the Gap between Essential Resources and Services & Community Needs

Applications are due by May 1, 2024.
Grants of up to $600,000 for up to three years will be awarded in support of descriptive studies that clarify mechanisms for reducing inequality or elucidate how or why a specific program, policy, or practice operates to reduce inequality; intervention studies that examine attempts to reduce inequality; and studies that improve the measurement of inequality in ways that can enhance the work of researchers, practitioners, or policy makers. Studies from a range of disciplines, fields, and methods are invited, and the foundation encourages investigations into various youth-serving systems, including justice, housing, child welfare, mental health, and education. The foundation is especially interested in research to reduce inequality in academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes; and studies to reduce inequality along the dimensions of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origin status.
Letters of inquiry are due May 1, 2024.  Selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals by August 5, 2024.
Within the priority areas, RRF will continue to award grants involving advocacy, direct service, professional education and training, research, and organizational capacity building. While the priority areas reflect RRF’s primary funding interests, the foundation remains open to supporting other opportunistic aging projects (on a selective basis).
  • Caregiving: Ensuring care partners are informed, well-trained, and supported while providing care to older people in community settings.
  • Housing: Promoting efforts to make housing more affordable and provide coordinated services that enable older people to live safely in community settings.
  • Economic Security in Later Life: Valuing the dignity of older people through efforts that ensure and protect their economic security and well-being.
  • Social and Intergenerational Connectedness: Strengthening social bonds through efforts that promote meaningful connections, including those that span generations.

Long-Term Effects of Disasters on Healthcare Systems in Populations with Health Disparities (R01) (NIH)

Earliest submission date is May 5, 2024.  Letters of Intent are due by standard dates through February 2027.

This program aims to support collaborative research focused on understanding the long-term effects of natural and/or human-made disasters on healthcare systems serving populations that experience health disparities living in the U.S. and its territories.

Mental Health Service Professional (MHSP) Demonstration Grant Program

Funder: US Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE), Office of Safe and Supportive Schools

Applications are due by May 15, 2024.

Description: The MHSP Program provides competitive grants to support and demonstrate innovative partnerships to train school-based mental health services providers for employment in schools and local educational agencies (LEAs). The goal of this program is to increase the number and diversity of high-quality, trained providers available to address the shortages of mental health services professionals in schools served by high-need LEAs. In addition to the placement of graduate students in school-based mental health fields into high-need schools served by the participating high-need LEAs, grantees may also develop mental health career pathways as early as secondary school, through career and technical education opportunities, or through paraprofessional support degree programs at local community or technical colleges.

NIJ Du Bois Program of Research on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Justice System (DOJ)

Proposals are are due May 16, 2024.

In this program, NIJ seeks applications for two categories of investigator-initiated research: (1) studies that examine how observed racial and ethnic disparities in the justice system might be reduced through public policy intervention at any point during the administration of justice and (2) studies that advance knowledge and practice, policy, or both regarding the intersections of race, ethnicity, crime, and justice within the United States.

Hanover Research calendars

Health Equity
Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar for minority serving institutions, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar for Minority Serving Institutions
Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar for minority serving institutions, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar – Education Research & Programs

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to education, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar – Health Research

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to health research, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar – Interdisciplinary Research

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to interdisciplinary research, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar – Student Success

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to student success, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar – Early Career Research

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to early research, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to diversity, equity, and inclusion, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar:  Environmental Sustainability

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to environmental sustainability, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.

Hanover Research Grants Calendar:  Research Centers

Click above to download a grant opportunities calendar specific to research centers, compiled by Hanover Research, a grants development firm working in partnership with UMBC-CAHSS.


Other resources

Research Infrastructure in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Program (RISBS) 

The U.S. National Science Foundation plays a critical role in supporting research infrastructure across a wide range of scientific disciplines, from telescopes to field stations. But sometimes research infrastructure takes less tangible or visible forms—things like large data repositories, long-running surveys, or web-based research tools. The new Research Infrastructure in the Social and Behavioral Sciences Program, or RISBS, supports critical research infrastructure in the social, behavioral and economic sciences, and its creation is part of an effort to make this infrastructure more visible and draw attention to its importance.

The Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences has a deep history of supporting research infrastructure, including three long-running data collection projects that provide critical information about U.S. society:

  • The American National Election Study, which started in 1948 and has been funded by NSF since 1977, provides gold standard data on voting, public opinion and political participation in U.S. national elections.
  • The General Social Survey, a nationally representative interview survey of the U.S. adult population, collects data on a wide range of topics and has been funded by NSF since its inception in 1972.
  • The Panel Study of Income Dynamics, a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families begun in 1968 (with NSF taking over most of its funding in 1980) collects data on a wide array of economic, social and health factors.

In addition to these projects, RISBS will support other projects that create computational tools and data to facilitate basic research in the social and behavioral sciences that can lead to improved health, prosperity and security. Prospective primary investigators are encouraged to contact the program directors listed on the RISBS web page for more information.

Hanover’s 2024 Grants Webinar Schedule

Register for upcoming sessions here.

NIH’s New Scientific Data Sharing Website

NIH has a long-standing commitment to making the research it funds available to the public. This commitment is demonstrated through a variety of sharing policies that function to increase the transparency and availability of scientific data and resources.  NIH policies expect:

  • The appropriate sharing of scientific data to be maximized
  • Data from large scale genomic studies to be broadly and responsibly shared
  • Research tools developed with NIH funding to be made accessible to other researchers
  • Unique model organisms to be made available to the scientific community
  • Clinical trials to be registered and summary results reported in ClinicalTrials.gov
  • Peer reviewed manuscripts to be publicly available on PubMed Central

The new website will help you navigate these policies, providing you with step-by-step guides, infographics, tools and resources to help you on your way. In the case of clinical trials and public access policies, the site provides a central access point and visibility to these policies, and links out to existing NIH sites for more information.

View a list of COVID-19-related funding opportunities maintained by GrantForward.


Other funding opportunities as well as databases and tools, including Grant Forward and Foundations Online, are available via UMBC’s Office of the Vice Provost for Research. Staff in UMBC’s Office of Sponsored Programs are available to meet with faculty to provide an overview of how to search for funding opportunities.

Researchers may also be interested in the eMaryland Marketplace Advantage (eMMA), which routinely adds opportunities, as well as the Governor’s Grants Office, which provides Maryland State specific funding opportunities. There are also institutional grant opportunities available through the Maryland Higher Education Commission.